In 2009, Practices Spent $68,274 Per Physician Interacting With Insurance Plans

In 2009, Practices Spent $68,274 Per Physician Interacting With Insurance Plans. “..When time is converted to dollars, practices spent an average of $68,274 per physician per year interacting with health plans (Exhibit 3). The median value was $51,043. Although per physician costs are lower in practices of ten or more physicians, there was not a […]

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Fewer Adults Have Difficulty Paying Their Medical Bills, but the Improvement Has Stalled

Fewer Adults Have Difficulty Paying Their Medical Bills, but the Improvement Has Stalled “There was modest but significant improvement following the ACA’s coverage expansions in the proportion of all U.S. adults who reported having difficulty paying their medical bills or said they were paying off medical debt over time (Table 4). Federal surveys have found […]

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Public Option Variants

Public option variants “Policymakers are floating several public-option variants, most of which would offer a public plan alongside private plans on the ACA’s insurance exchanges. Although a few of these variants would allow persons to buy in to Medicaid, most envision a new plan that would pay Medicare rates and use providers who participate in […]

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Public Option unable to Compete with Private Plans

Public option unable to compete with private plans A quarter century of experience with public/private competition in the Medicare program demonstrates that the private plans will not allow a level playing field. Despite strict regulation, private insurers have successfully cherry picked healthier seniors, and have exploited regional health spending differences to their advantage. They have […]

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A Public Option Forgoes at least 84% of Administrative Savings

A public option forgoes at least 84% of administrative savings “[The public option] forgoes at least 84 percent of the administrative savings available through single payer. The public plan option would do nothing to streamline the administrative tasks (and costs) of hospitals, physicians offices, and nursing homes, which would still contend with multiple payers, and […]

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Multiple Insurers are Intrinsically More Costly than Single-payer Systems such as Canada’s

Multiple insurers are intrinsically more costly than single-payer systems such as Canada’s “A system with multiple insurers is also intrinsically costlier than a single-payer system. For insurers it means multiple duplicative claims-processing facilities and smaller insured groups, both of which increase overhead. Fragmentation also raises costs for providers who must deal with multiple insurance products […]

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