Adopting Single-Payer Drastically Reduces National Health Expenditures

Adopting Single-Payer Drastically Reduces National Health Expenditures “Before implementation of the NHI, annual growth of national health expenditures in Taiwan averaged in the double-digit range. During the period 1992–95, for example, average annual growth was 13.9 percent. 12 In the years immediately following the NHI’s introduction, that growth decreased to 6.0–9.0 percent. Since full implementation of the global budget […]

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Medicare for All would Lead to Income Gains for Majority of Working People

Medicare for All would Lead to Income Gains for Majority of Working People “Many people believe that the United States has a progressive tax system: you pay more, as a fraction of your income, as you earn more. In fact, if you allocate the total official tax take of the United States across the population, […]

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Funding Improved Medicare for All Would be Progressive, Lifting Burden from Individuals

Funding Improved Medicare for All Would be Progressive, Lifting Burden from Individuals “Government spending on health care would increase substantially under a single-payer system. In 2017, just under half of the $3.5 trillion in national health care spending came from private sources. Shifting a large amount of expenditures from private to public sources would significantly […]

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Households Earning $30k to $130k would save the Most Money with NIMA

Households Earning $30k to $130k Would Save the Most Money with NIMA “Improved Medicare for All will redistribute income by reducing the burden of health-care costs on the sick and disabled, redistributing the burden of health-care finance from lump-sum payment insurance premiums to tax payments associated with income.51 The redistributive effect will depend, of course, […]

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NIMA Savings Enough to Cover the Uninsured and Upgrade Benefits for All

NIMA Savings Enough To Cover The Uninsured and Upgrade Benefits for All “Under the single-payer system created by HR 676, the U.S. could save an estimated $592 billion annually by slashing the administrative waste associated with the private insurance industry ($476 billion) and reducing pharmaceutical prices to European levels ($116 billion). In 2014, the savings […]

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Current Healthcare Revenues Would Be Funneled into NIMA

Current Healthcare Revenues Would Be Funneled into NIMA “..The program would be supported using currently dedicated revenues and additional taxes. Available revenues include federal funds committed to Medicare, Medicaid, and other federal programs, plus state revenues currently paid into the Medicaid system and those dedicated to school health and other state programs..” “Currently available funding […]

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$1099 Billion in Potential Savings with Medicare for All

$1099 Billion in Potential Savings in 3 Spending Categories Savings in provider administration, $192 billion; Savings from eliminating private insurance, $258 billion; Savings from using Medicare-negotiated rates (reduces costs of hospitals, drugs, and medical devices), $649 billion. Total savings, $1099 billion. “Note: This figure shows potential savings in 2019 from an Improved Medicare for All […]

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Savings Dramatically Reduce Need For Additional Revenues

Savings Dramatically Reduce the Need for Additional Revenues   “..Overall, the ten-year national savings on health-care expenditures range from a low of over $6 trillion to a high of over $13 trillion. In every model tested, Improved Medicare for All is cheaper than the current system even while providing improved health care. The savings dramatically […]

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Reducing Bureaucratic Waste Would Save $140 Billion Annually

Reducing Bureaucratic Waste Would Save $140 Billion Annually “The fiscal case for NHI arises from the observation that bureaucracy now consumes nearly 30% of our health care budget, as well as the fact that this enormous bureaucratic burden is a peculiarly American phenomenon. Our biggest HMOs keep 20%, even 25%, of premiums for their overhead […]

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